bounty

Well lets see now, this is where we are with my harvest as summer slams the door in me face and yours too possibly?

bounty5

bucket full of carrots and beets, oh and my skanky gardening shoes…

bounty1

two fairly decent sized onions…

bounty3

YES the never ending supply of rainbow chard… pretty right? pretty sick of it by now too!

bounty

new stuff… okay we have the first of the yellow crook neck squash… very exciting, one head of broccoli, also very exciting… some more cucumbers, weird looking I know they are Poona Kheera breed, super duper crunchy and grow in an assortment of odd shapes, sizes and colors…. yes crazy.

And finally the vege, to completely get your knickers in a twist over, the highly anticipated TOMATOES! all FIVE of them, the rest look like this…

toms

pretty right? strategically shot minus the disgusting black rotting limbs that are holding these beauties up…

toms1

pretty friggin disgusting.. if you ask me, although the marigolds are a lovely color.

toms4

this variety is called “Peach” but it ain’t all peachy on this plant

toms3

this is “Ruby” looks good now but I think their days are definitely numbered..

Advertisements

6 Comments

  1. Posted September 1, 2009 at 3:27 pm | Permalink

    I am so impressed with all you bounty! Congrats! yOu need a farm stand for all that swiss chard!:)
    looks amazing!

  2. Michael
    Posted September 1, 2009 at 8:48 pm | Permalink

    Tomatoes were a bust this year. It just never got hot enough to turn them. We we joking that we’d be serving frozen green tomatoes this year.

    The cucumber & mint sorbet is a clever idea. Having lived in the middle east, cucumber and mint are a common base in dishes. It sounds like a great end to a meal.

  3. Gabriel
    Posted September 1, 2009 at 10:13 pm | Permalink

    We gave up this weekend and cut down all of our tomato plants. I’ll send you a photo of what we were able to harvest. Looks like more than it really is. I’m cooking them down (cause they’re small) and freezing them. Hopefully enough for one sauce. Whatever was still green we bagged. Shame. Oh well. I’ve got seeds. There will be better years.

  4. Posted September 2, 2009 at 10:38 am | Permalink

    Remember to put those late-blight-infested rotten tomato plants in a garbage bag and throw them out with the trash when you’ve harvested what you can. Don’t compost them! Tell your friends! Here’s hoping next year is better for tomatoes!(and people!)

    I’ve always had luck with getting my green tomatoes to ripen. I just put them all together in a cardboard box or a basket, and little by little, they ripen, sitting on the counter. They’re nothing like vine ripened fruit, but they’re still better than store bought!

    • thecatskillkiwi
      Posted September 2, 2009 at 12:10 pm | Permalink

      thanks for the advice i think i will pull off what i can and say goodbye to the rest… better luck next year.

  5. Jill
    Posted September 3, 2009 at 7:59 pm | Permalink

    Well, I will be eating my words. At your very first post…I said, we will see how green your fingers are! congrats on your wonderful bounty through the summer. What fantastic and cunning ways to use excess veg! As we are just celebrating the return of Spring here in N.Z., with snow…I will reachign for your website to try your delicious recipes, well done sis on your first year in the garden XX


Post a Comment

Required fields are marked *
*
*

%d bloggers like this: